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6 Fun Things to Do in Retirement

Retirement Living Community
19 April 2021

Whether you’re about to retire, have just retired, or it’s been a few years since you did, it can be hard to find something to fill your time. Many older Australians are looking for things to do in retirement that keep them interested and busy as it can sometimes be more difficult to enjoy the activities you once did.

Luckily, there isn’t a lack of activities to help break the boredom and keep your mind and body active. From making new friends to picking up a new hobby, here are six interesting and fun things to do in retirement:

1. Travel

After a lifetime of hard work with only a few weeks of holiday a year, retirement is the perfect time to get out and explore. Travelling is one of the top activities that retirees engage in, and this isn’t limited to international travel. Local holidays are affordable (and very popular during these times of COVID-19 international travel restrictions) but can still give you the excitement of discovering somewhere new.

Visiting new countries and experiencing new cultures is a great way to learn more about the world. Some have specific cities they want to visit, while others enjoy a more consistent travel schedule to see as much as they can. If you’re not able to travel abroad in the near time, planning for when you can, and researching the travel destinations of your dreams, can be a fun and educational past time.

2. Volunteering

If you find that you miss the accomplishment you felt while working, volunteering is a rewarding way to find purpose again. Sharing the skills you’ve developed throughout your life to have positive impact in your community can leave you feeling more fulfilled. Research has shown that older adults who participate in volunteering activities have improved physical and emotional health and experience greater life satisfaction.

There are many volunteer positions across Australia, including with IRT’s team who empower older Australians to live free from disadvantage. So, how do you choose? The main ways to select a volunteer role are choosing a cause or organisation that you want to help and choosing a role based on the skills you can offer or want to develop.

3. Sport

Keeping your body moving isn’t just about physical health, it also plays an important part in keeping your mind healthy. Choosing an activity you enjoy that helps keep your body active, and if possible includes a social opportunity, can help prevent the feeling that exercising is a chore.

You can take part in any sport that interests you, whether it’s swimming, surfing, dancing, or even yoga as long as it keeps you moving. Many sports also have groups that meet regularly where you can meet like-minded people of a similar ability to help encourage you.

4. Lifelong learning

Experts believe that lifelong learning beyond retirement helps reduce the risk of memory loss issues. Whether you’re looking to start a university degree, or just want to get your social media updated, teaching yourself new skills and learning more about a passion subject can further develop your problem-solving skills and improve your overall wellbeing.

For those wanting to improve their online skills, the Tech-Savvy Seniors program and BeConnected both offer free courses to those looking to learn more about technology.

5. Find a new hobby

Retirement is the perfect opportunity for you to try something you’ve not done before. You may have lived most of your life on a tight schedule, with very little time for a hobby between work and family commitments. Now could be the perfect time for you to pick up a hobby you didn’t have time for before.

You could try your hand at painting or pottery, take a cooking class, join a book club, or even have a go at growing your own vegetables. There are countless hobbies that can be picked up during retirement, and challenging yourself to something new helps keep your mind active and boredom at bay.

6. Social groups

Making new friends and maintaining social connections may seem to be overwhelming and at times physically challenging as you age, but the good news is many people are in the same boat making retirement an excellent time to find new friends. Having meaningful relationships with friends and family can reduce feelings of loneliness and provide a support network when you need it.

An easy way to meet new people is to join a social group or organised activity for an interest or hobby you have, or are interested in. It can be hard to find these groups if you’ve recently moved to a new area, but social media and the local newspaper are great ways to find events in your area. You may find that activities are run by your local council specifically for people in retirement.

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